How to Store Wheat Berries in Buckets And Bags

what is the best way to store wheat berries for long term food storage

Wheat berries are great to keep in your long-term food storage because it can stay good for a long time unless insects, heat, or a wet/moist environment ruins your wheat. So how do you safely store your wheat to prevent it from going bad before you get the chance to use it?

To store wheat berries, pour them directly in an air-tight mylar bag or in a food-grade bucket that is placed in a cool, dry environment that is safe from insects. It is also effective to store wheat berries by freezing, using a vacuum-sealed container, dry ice (CO2), or oxygen absorbers.

Wheat is the cornerstone of any emergency storage supply. Approximately 180 to 200 lbs will supply an adult for one year. A three-week emergency supply is approximately 10-15 lbs per adult. Children 7 years old or younger would need half those amounts. To get a good idea of the how much wheat you should store for the long term check out our Food Storage Calculator.

Finding Wheat Berries to Store

The two main types of wheat berries to buy for food storage are hard wheat berries and soft wheat berries. 

Wheat TypeProteinBest Use(s)
Hard red spring , Hard red winter & Hard white wheat11-15%bread flour (high gluten)
Soft red winter, Soft white winter & Soft white spring9-12%pasta, cake, biscuit, cracker, and pastry flours (low gluten)

To find high-quality wheat and other recommended food items check out our article Food Storage Items: What are the BEST foods for long term storage?

Wheat can ground into flour and used to make different types of bread

Packaging Wheat Berries for long term storage

Store wheat in moisture-proof, food-grade packaging. Examples include: 

Be aware that rodents can chew through plastic bags. Wheat stored in 10-pound bags is easy to manipulate, facilitates rotation, allows easy inspection of the grain, and compartmentalizes the grain so contamination of one lot does not expose large quantities of stored grain to contamination. Several bags can be placed inside a 5-gallon plastic bucket. It is not necessary to store wheat in the absence of oxygen unless insects are present.

Wheat Storage Methods and Conditions

  • Food-grade container or bucket
    • Cool
    • Dry
    • Off the floor
    • Away from insects
  • Freezing
  • Vacuum Sealing
  • Dry Ice (CO2)
  • Oxygen Absorbers

Freezing

Freezing doesn’t harm wheat as long as it’s well packaged, and can help it retain its freshness and nutritional value. Package the grain into food safe freezer containers, heavy-duty freezer bags or vacuum-sealed bags, then label and date them. Position the wheat in the deepest corners of your freezer, where the temperature remains most stable, and remove it in small quantities when you need it.

Vacuum Sealing

The best storage method really depends on how long you actually intend to store the item. If you’re looking at the possibility of 5 or more years, I would recommend using mylar bags instead of regular foodsaver bags as they are even more airtight and help guard against oxidation and incidental sunlight as well. You can vacuum out the oxygen and seal them in FoodSaver, or you can use an oxygen absorber to remove every last trace of oxygen and just use the FoodSaver to seal them. As long as the berries are completely dry when they go in, stay dry, relatively cool, and out of the sunlight they will last “indefinitely”.

Dry Ice (CO2)

best way to store wheat berries using dry ice

Using carbon dioxide (CO2) from dry ice to replace the oxygen before closing it protects the wheat berries even more. CO2 is heavier than oxygen and goes to the bottom of the container, pushing the oxygen. 

How to use dry ice to store wheat
  • Place 3-4” of grain in the bottom of a 5-gallon plastic bucket. 
  • Use gloves when handling dry ice. 
  • Add 2-3 oz. crushed dry ice. 
  • Fill the container to the full height. 
  • Place the lid on top slightly askew. 
  • After 30 minutes, seal the lid air-tight. 

Dry ice will control most adult and larval insects present but usually will not destroy eggs or pupae. If properly applied, a single treatment with dry ice is sufficient for long-term storage. Annual dry ice treatments are not necessary unless an infestation is recognized in the stored grain. Treating grain with dry ice does not reduce its ability to sprout or its food value.

Oxygen Absorbers

Seal wheat in Mylar-type bags or #10 cans along with appropriate number of oxygen absorber packets to create an oxygen-free atmosphere. This will kill adult insects and prevent larval insects from surviving.

Storage MethodStorage Recommendations
InsecticidesNOT RECOMMENDED, may be toxic if not correctly used
HeatingNOT RECOMMENDED, too difficult to control the correct amount of heat to apply.
FreezingFreeze 1-15 lb bags of wheat for 2-3 days. Allow to warm for 24 hours. Freezing kills live pests, but not insect eggs. Multiple freezing and warming cycles may be needed to kill all insects and hatching eggs.
Vacuum SealingSeal wheat in vacuum bags following vacuum sealer instructions. 
Dry Ice (CO2)Place 3-4” of grain in the bottom of a 5-gallon plastic bucket. Use gloves when handling dry ice. Add 2-3 oz. crushed dry ice. Fill the container to the full height. Place the lid on top slightly askew. After 30 minutes, seal the lid air-tight. Dry ice will control most adult and larval insects present, but usually will not destroy eggs or pupae. If properly applied, a single treatment with dry ice is sufficient for long-term storage.Annual dry ice treatments are not necessary unless an infestation is recognized in the stored grain. Treating grain with dry ice does not reduce its ability to sprout or its food value.
Oxygen AbsorbersSeal wheat in Mylar-type bags or #10 cans along with appropriate number of oxygen absorber packets to create an oxygen-free atmosphere.
Food-Grade Bag Containers and BucketChoose insect-free sources for wheat. Store them in clean and dry containers impermeable to insects.

Other Storage Conditions to be mindful of

Storing wheat at 40-60°F is optimal but is usually impractical in most homes except during winter months. Freezing or sub-zero temperatures do not damage stored grains. Storage at temperatures above 60°F causes a more rapid decline in seed viability (ability to germinate) but only a slightly faster loss in food value. 

Dangers of high moisture levels 

  • mold growth 
  • chemical degradation

Store containers off the floor especially off concrete floors. Concrete can wick moisture to stored containers very easily Inspect grain often for insect activity.

What is the shelf life of wheat?

A good rule of thumb is to rotate wheat so that no stored product is older than 5 years. However, older stored wheat can make acceptable bread. A study at Brigham Young University indicated that, regardless of headspace oxygen level, wheat packaged in No. 10 cans throughout 32 years of storage at ambient or cooler temperatures made bread acceptable to a majority of consumers.

Develop a program to utilize stored wheat on a regular basis. As stored wheat is used, replace it with containers of new wheat.

For more information on home food storage visit NCHFP.

Colton Blair

I'm Colton Blair, co-owner of EZ-Prepping with my wife Kaycee. I value the safety, protection, and well-being of my family above all else. Finding easy and practical ways of prepping for emergencies or unexpected disaster has become very important to me.

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